Truth Matters.

Author

Contributing Writer - page 2

Contributing Writer has 345 articles published.

Letter to the Editor: Dan Rotach

in Letters to the Editor/Opinion by

Adjunct professor of psychology Dan Rotach responds to reactions in the aftermath of Jamie Hudalla’s column, Naked and Unafraid. As a result of a recent article in the Clarion about sexuality, a number of people have asked for clarity in what I teach in GES208, Human Sexuality, at Bethel University. This is a general education course that looks at sexuality from an evangelical faith basis, and looks at sexuality as it is portrayed in contemporary culture. The course description is this: “An examination of authentic and inauthentic human sexuality, focusing on the nature of sexual and reproductive functioning, sexual self understanding, sexual dimensions of interpersonal relationships, and ethical dimensions of sexuality.” There is a section in my class called “An Honest Hermeneutic” where I empower the students, when they are forging any life-shaping decisions, especially about sexuality, that they read, interpret and apply the Bible in ways that it was…

Keep Reading

Athletic training program moving into graduate school

in News by

By Sam Johnson Amid administrative changes, Bethel is transitioning its program into the graduate school, creating mixed emotions on campus. Since 2001, Bethel University has been one of two schools in the MIAC to offer athletic training as a degree, along with Gustavus Adolphus. But recently, administration is making some changes to the academic process of the curriculum that has existed in the undergrad school since its inception 18 years ago.   The approved changes, made by CAATE (Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education), is causing administration at Bethel to change the educational requirement for students to now be taught athletic training at the graduate school only. That is consistent with any school in the country that previously offered an undergrad program in athletic training. According to associate provost Dr. Deb Sullivan-Trainor, this means that athletic training students at Bethel are going to be given the “3-2” academic setup.…

Keep Reading

Built-in best friends

in Culture Arts & Lifestyle by

Halle and Hadley Rittgers share what it’s like to be twins Interview and photo by Laura Osterlund Who is older? Halle: I am older by two minutes. How are the two of you similar? Hadley: We both did all the same sports growing up, and we both are passionate about art and science. Hadley: We have similar friends, but we also have different friends. Halle: I would like to say though, with all of this, I feel like we’re kind of equally similar and equally different. I feel like sometimes we’re so much alike, and we are identical and stuff, but we still definitely have our differences, and I think that balances us out a little. Hadley: College has let us find our individuality. Halle: I also think we’re similar just with certain things we like and similar styles, but not exactly the same. Like we still have our own…

Keep Reading

A warm community in a cold climate

in News by

Vice president for Student Life Dr. William Washington braced the outdoor cold for an inward warmth. By Dr. Washington I was content and comfortable at the institution where I had attended as an undergrad and served various professional capacities for over 28 years. My wife and I would often remark that if I left that place, we would move somewhere warm where I could work on my suntan year-round! Minnesota, especially this year, would not fall under the category of “warm.” Although I was looking for a warm climate, the Lord was looking for me to be in a warm community. So, who is Bethel? What makes Bethel a warm community? It’s the people – students, staff, faculty, administration, alumni. When I first had the opportunity to interact with students, I experienced first-hand their thoughtfulness, character, and integrity. I saw how much they loved each other and the Lord. Bethel…

Keep Reading

Paradox panel

in News by

Three professors discuss artwork from the new gallery show By Elena Vaughn The Underground was packed with students and faculty Wednesday night for The Paradox of Beauty panel discussion. Art professor Wayne Roosa, philosophy professor Carrie Peffley and English professor Angela Shannon engaged in discussion about The Beautiful, the new exhibit in the Olson Gallery. The exhibit is sponsored by Christians in Visual Arts and features 33 artworks focused on the theme of beauty in the fallen world. Art professor, gallery director and CIVA board member Michelle Wingard moderated the event. Roosa gave a thoughtful musing on the different paradigms of “classical beauty” and the expression “beauty is in the eye of the beholder.” “Beauty is not a thing,” Roosa said. “It is more like an agency, the living dynamic.” After Roosa’s remarks, Peffley discussed the difference between kitsch, surface level aesthetic appeal and true beauty. “The beauty of true…

Keep Reading

The self-serving identity crisis

in News by

A manifesto on being a 20-something with a migrating identity. By Jamie Hudalla | Columnist Recently, I put myself in a time-out for the weekend. Three friends and I took a writer’s retreat to Door Country, five hours and 12 Amish-crossing signs away. We rented a cabin in the woods from a white-bearded man named Ransom. He had freezers full of meat, windows without blinds and a bidet in the bathroom, so we slept with kitchen shears under our pillows. We survived the night and wandered Sturgeon Bay the next morning until we found a bookstore. Popping our heads in morphed into an hour and a half endeavor. A middle-aged man named John worked the front desk. He was a retired nuclear physicist, or in his words, he made very little objects that made very big booms. He’d lived in Israel and Russia, attended John Hopkins University and owns a…

Keep Reading

We are all Bethel stereotypes

in News by

By Josh Towner I like to think of myself as an independent person who isn’t tied down by the cliches and stereotypes at Bethel. I don’t attend chapel very often, I go on rants where I curse like a sailor and I have occasionally broken the covenant. I don’t party at the U, but I’m also not a shift leader. I like to think of myself as a mature, nuanced person, separate from the Bethel bubble, but I also think my Vans look pretty cool. I have a hydro flask mug and a metal water bottle. I know what kind of panini I like, I say hi to Geetha and I enjoy sitting in the BC. I like to think of myself as a free spirit on a campus that seems to agree on a little too much, but when I truly examine who I am, I’m just another Bethel…

Keep Reading

Transforming Bethel’s DNA

in Culture Arts & Lifestyle by

Chief Diversity Officer Ruben Rivera discusses exclusive Christianity and tackles what it means to be a reconciler amidst diversity in Bethel University’s community. By Emma Harville Junior Hilda Davis knows what it’s like to be the only one. Pulling up to Edgren Hall at Bethel University her freshman year, she knew that it would be different from Champlin Park, the diverse high school she spent her last four years at. What she didn’t anticipate was the lack of connection she would feel with the rest of the student body because of that difference. Davis was shocked during Welcome Week as white students flooded the campus, but she couldn’t seem to find many students who looked like her. She sat in several general education courses in which she was the only student of color. When she greeted a group of girls on her floor, she was met with little response. Discouraged,…

Keep Reading

Bethel seems scared

in Opinion by

Vinding is an English professor and Director of Writing at Bethel. By April Vinding Scared. It seems we’re mostly scared. Afraid to speak in class. Afraid there’s no job waiting. Afraid being at a small Christian school undermines our credibility as scholars. Afraid we’ll lose the jobs we have. Afraid we’ll never find love. Afraid the love we have is as good as it gets. Afraid to disappoint our parents. Afraid we haven’t given our children enough. Afraid of being unknown. Afraid of being known. And those fears are valid. I haven’t published for two years because the judgement I received when I divorced, from intimate friends and the church, destroyed my belief in the goodwill of strangers. I’ve stopped bringing treats to classes because students stopped saying thanks. I’ve stopped asking acquaintances to plays or yoga because half don’t even respond to the invitation. I’ve stopped asking some of…

Keep Reading

Go to Top