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Christine Ramstad

Christine Ramstad has 12 articles published.

WITTY RANTER EP05: The Book Episode

in Culture Arts & Lifestyle/Opinion/Podcast by

  THE BOOKS EPISODE features Jackie Lea Sommers, a young-adult author from the Twin Cities who battled obsessive compulsive disorder until she found treatment in her early 20s. She published her debut novel, Truest, in 2015 and her second book is set to release in the fall of 2018. Host Christine Schuster and co-host Kellie Lawless talk about their shared love for fictional young-adult novels and Kellie geeks out about Mark Twain. Schuster’s mom just wants to know if it’s true. Host and producer: Christine Schuster is a senior journalism and musical theater major. She can really write and report and do other stuff. She wrote this wedding story for City Pages. From Eagan, Schuster has interned at the Guthrie Theater on both the artistic and communications side. She’s obsessed with really old vintage clothing, NASCAR and Broadway. Co-Host: Kellie Lawless is a junior journalism major. When she’s not writing her own novel, she’s running a photography business or watching Friends.  

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Carrying the Legacy

in Culture Arts & Lifestyle by

One student takes on the unquie role of the family’s 30th member to attend Bethel. By Kellie Lawless | Features Reporter Emma Forsline was getting impatient. The toe of her white sneakers tickled the blades of grass while her aunts and uncles corralled everyone together for a picture. To a four-year old,  it seemed like was taking forever. Her fingers swatted away a pesky fly that landed on the rim of her white baseball cap, embroidered with  “Bethel College” on the front when her dad scooped her up from behind, carrying her over to join the rest of the family. Everyone huddled together, wearing the same light grey shirt with the logo for Bethel College stamped on the front. Just before the picture was taken, Emma’s dad handed her a yellow banner and the shutter snapped, just as Emma looked down to admire it. Even though Emma didn’t know it…

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Witty Ranter EP04: The Money Episode

in Culture Arts & Lifestyle/Opinion/Podcast by

THE MONEY EPISODE features Sterling Witzke, a venture capitalist at Winklevoss Capital – yes, the Olympic athletes from The Social Network. Host Christine Schuster and co-host Maddy Simpson chat about buying expensive clogs and spending money on themselves after a break-up. Somehow they end the episode with a reflection on the importance of living within their means. Witzke graduated from Stanford University and Wharton School of Business and brings ideas and dreams into reality. She helps people who want to change the world find a way to do it. Originally from South Dakota, her dad always told her she could do whatever a man could—but better.   WITTY RANTER PODCAST takes on vague themes each week within art and culture. The host generally knows nothing about the topic, but can talk for hours about it with her co-host. She also brings in edgy guests – such as Wired magazine’s Liz Stinson, The Moth’s Erin Barker…

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Witty Ranter Podcast EP03: The Movie Episode

in Culture Arts & Lifestyle/Podcast by

  THE MOVIE EPISODE features Euan Kerr, a Scottish Minnesota Public Radio arts reporter who loves punk music and cat documentaries (but not cats). While Euan shares his thoughts on the movie industry, host Christine Schuster and co-host Sarah Nelson describe their quirky favorite movies and Netflix habits, like “making time for Buffy.” Kerr, from Glasgow, has done two stints at MPR, and worked at the BBC between them. He also was a radio DJ until that got so boring that he went to Wisconsin. Witty Ranter liked him because he fights for the little film the way journalists fight for the little guy. We hope you like him as much as he did, even if you’re a big guy. WITTY RANTER PODCAST takes on vague themes each week within art and culture. The host generally knows nothing about the topic, but can talk for hours about it with her co-host. She…

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Witty Ranter Podcast EP02: The Love Episode

in Culture Arts & Lifestyle/Podcast by

  (Editor’s note: The audio has been updated and improved on this episode.) THE LOVE EPISODE features Story Collider’s Erin Barker talking about getting in front of strangers to share her innermost love secrets. Weaved into and around Barker’s ideas, host Christine Schuster and co-host Tatiana Lee tell their love stories, and also bring discuss who they would want to sing at their weddings, getting dumped and Bob Hope. Erin Barker tells stories as Artistic Director at the Story Collider – subscribe now! – by  talking to scientists to figure out why they love their research so much. In her personal storytelling time, she wins Grand Slams at The Moth – the first woman to do that – by sharing romantic breakups, family breakups and even breakups with the Girl Scouts. WITTY RANTER PODCAST takes on vague themes each week within art and culture. The host generally knows nothing about the topic, but can talk for hours about it with…

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Witty Ranter Podcast: EP01 The Techie-Sciencie Episode

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THE TECHIE-SCIENCIE EPISODE features Wired magazine’s Liz Stinson talking about translating design into stories and Story Collider’s Erin Barker talking about turning science into stories. In between, host Christine Schuster and co-host Peyton Witzke talk about magic cat litter, death-acting in the nursing department and science project injuries. Liz Stinson is a Brooklyn-based reporter for Wired design. She loves covering art, design, technology and where they all intersect. Wired is an American magazine that is offered in print and online as well. Wired focuses on how emerging technologies affect culture, the economy and politics. Its headquarters are in San Francisco, California and has been in publication since 1993. Erin Barker is in the business of telling stories. Artistic Director at the Story Collider, Barker spends her work time talking to scientists to find out who they are, and what their stories are. In her personal storytelling time, she wins Grand Slams at The Moth,…

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Love Series: Why I got married at 21

in Love Series/Opinion by

(EDITOR’S NOTE: This piece was first appeared in City Pages, a Twin Cities alternative weekly.) Christine Schuster | Managing Editor I said yes to getting married over the shouts of a middle-aged man wearing short shorts and no shirt. He was yelling something about private property. It was the summer after my junior year of college, and my boyfriend James had been dropping hints for months. I picked up on them, and had just one request: The location had to be somewhere I could feel anonymous. No family or friends around, at most a small population of the general public. Gold Medal Park would’ve been perfect. We had some fun memories there, like the time I dropped my keys down one of the slats in the wooden benches – essentially, a box bolted into cement – and James spent an hour fishing them out with a stick. But when we arrived that…

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Looking Up

in News by

Micah Latty | For the Clarion I don’t like Facebook.[1] Anyone paying a bit too much attention would notice my account flickering in and out of existence like one of those magic birthday candles that relights a few moments and you blow it out. Except, of course, that Facebook doesn’t keep mysteriously reactivating itself. I suppose this makes my situation somewhat funny, if not also pathetic. Perhaps tragic. My first concern about Facebook is the way that it, as it becomes ever more ever-present in our lives, distracts us from (and spoils us for) the world around us. Last summer, watching a child about age 11 meander across an intersection, face glued to his iPad while playing Pokemon Go, I sourly remarked to a friend that the kid would be better off “staring at a tree or something.” My best childhood memories are of faithfully reading the shredded wheats box every…

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A Letter to the Privileged

in News by

CeCe Gaines When I went to sleep on Nov. 8, I knew Donald Trump could potentially win the election. It was  a disheartening notion, but not a problem I could control. I was disturbed waking up on Nov. 9, and seeing the first post on my timeline featuring the Ku Klux Klan parading on a bridge, to celebrate Trump’s victory in North Carolina. This post not only infuriated me but engulfed me in a level of fear I have never experienced before. It saddened me that almost an entire nation could look past the inexcusable qualities of a candidate and still vote for him. Vehemently claiming he is the lesser of two evils. The blatant hatred that I’ve witnessed from some Trump supporters baffles me. The fact that one man could bring out so much hate in this country in such a short amount of time, shows how weak and…

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