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Jasmine Johnson

Jasmine Johnson has 21 articles published.

Bridging two worlds

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Professor Jessica Henderson explores technology’s effect on her life through new exhibit.  By Jasmine Johnson Family members, friends, students and faculty crowded into the wooden encased Eastlund Room Nov. 8. The original setup of 98 chairs was not enough for the endless line of supporters streaming through the double doors. “Some of us when we go on sabbatical will rest, but Jess just made a lot of artwork,” gallery director Michelle Wingard said. “So much artwork that our entire gallery is Henderson-ified.” With the help of faculty development and alumni grants, design professor Jessica Henderson was able to complete the Johnson gallery exhibit “uhhh, u there?” during her time off on sabbatical spring 2018. The collection explored the half-and-half nature of her exposure to technology: half of her life free from it and the other half absorbed and surrounded by it. From her first Internet search for Mad Magazine to…

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A space for Catholic students

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New club provides opportunity for Catholic students to gather and share faith By Emma Melling The room is quiet, the only sound a fan whirring in the distance. A group of six sits on wheeling chairs patterned with blue, green and brown. Hands raise to make the sign of the cross as junior Grace Nichols prays. “In the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.” This is a meeting of Bethel’s new Catholic club, a space for Catholic students to gather, live life and talk about their shared faith. After trying to get the club off of the ground since spring of 2018, the club was finally passed and made official Oct. 29. Club leader, junior Grace Nichols, talked about why the club was started. “The heart behind creating this is that it’s hard to be Catholic at Bethel, for many reasons,” Nichols said. “You kind of feel casted…

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Model United Nations expands

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Model UN prepared for its annual conference. By Lindsey Micucci Bethel University’s Model UN attended the American Model United Nations simulation conference in Chicago, Illinois Nov. 17-20, along with 90 universities from across the United States. The conference covered topics ranging from international security to environmental issues. In each committee, the goal is to work with other “countries” to create resolutions and solutions to the issue topic that’s being discussed. Although some schools see the conference as a competition, Mariah Marr, senior political science and international relations major and head delegate of Venezuela, emphasized the learning experience she sees from representing another country and taking the simulations seriously. According to Marr, all students are going into the conference with the goals of passing as many resolutions as possible and representing Bethel well. Last year, Bethel could only send 10 people to represent one country. This year, because of the spark…

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The case for BUILD

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A former BUILD student’s family is suing Bethel for disability discrimination. This year, a pilot program was initiated to incorporate BUILD students into CAS classes. By Emily Jan, Elena Vaughn and Maddie DeBilzan Local news outlets lauded Bethel University’s Inclusive Learning and Development (BUILD) program in 2016 for sending its first round of students through to graduation. The Star Tribune named it “one of only a few such programs in Minnesota to give students with intellectual disabilities a chance at college life.” But Nov. 14, Christopher and Jennifer Camota Luebke claimed that Bethel did not uphold its word and failed to follow state law when their son – who left Bethel last year – was not treated equally as a student with intellectual disabilities. The parents are suing Bethel for disability discrimination. The student of the family who sued, whose name was not released, attended Bethel’s BUILD program in the…

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Story unfolds for campus theft

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Students lose cameras, computers, and class time. By Zach Walker One facilities management cart, two men and a car. That’s all it took for more than $55,000 worth of media production equipment to be stolen from the communication studies department at Bethel University Nov. 6. The motive of the crime is still unknown, but the case is currently under open investigation by the Ramsey County Police Department. “The Office of Safety and Security is currently investigating the crime with multiple local law enforcement agencies,” Bethel Director of Risk Management Zachary Hill said. According to Hill, although the case remains partially unresolved, the robbery itself was caught on camera and the logistics and effects have been determined. “What we know about the incident is that the two unknown males entered campus in the evening… and spent a significant amount of time in the Johnson Art Gallery,” Hill said. On Nov. 7…

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Proposal previews and cabinet changes

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Recent executive turnover and innovative ideas discussed at community gathering By Jasmine Johnson The Underground echoed with the lyrics of happy birthday Tuesday morning as faculty and staff gathered for updated information from President Jay Barnes and the cabinet. The morale was lifted compared to the meeting two months earlier after the announcement of the budget cuts around campus. Barnes began the meeting by addressing the many staffing changes and temporary stand-ins within the cabinet. The search for a new Chief Enrollment Officer “proceeds more slowly than I wish,” Barnes said. Amidst all this change, Barnes also announced Senior Vice President for Advancement Mark Miles’ resignation from the university effective Dec. 15. He accepted a position as chief development officer in Seattle that is closer to his daughter’s family. Barnes asked Associate Vice President for Alumni and Family Relations and Advancement Operations Jim Bender to serve as the temporary chief…

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Parents of former BUILD student file lawsuit

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Student’s parents express concern for the failed promises BUILD program claims By Jasmine Johnson Rather than the all-inclusive, open environment advertised, Christopher and Jennifer Camota Luebke claimed that Bethel did not uphold its word and failed to follow state law when their son was not treated equally as a person and student with intellectual disabilities, according to a recent story by Fox 9. The parents are suing Bethel for disability discrimination. The student’s name was not released in any of the statements. He is referred to as AC. He attended the program fall 2017, but his parents withdrew him from Bethel after it was clear that he was not receiving the opportunities as promised. When enrolling in the BUILD program, his parents were told that he would be able to engage and participate with non-disabled students, which is not what happened according to their attorney Phillip Villaume. “What we were…

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From backyards to big leagues

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  A twelve-year-old’s side job transformed into a multi-service company. By Jasmine Johnson As a middle-schooler, Tanner McCarron knocked on every neighborhood door to pick up lawn mowing jobs. Nine years later, he now manages his own company from 250 miles away. Tanner’s Lawn Care Services ran for three years before McCarron partnered with his childhood best friend Nathan Bajema. The two combined their smaller lawn mowing gigs into one unified business to see how they could improve their sales and services. They changed the title to TNT Lawn Care, short for Tanner Nathan Total Lawn Care. Bajema and McCarron’s business started in local backyards near Sioux Falls, South Dakota where they grew up. Soon after combining his business with McCarron, Bajema decided to leave TNT and start working towards his passion for health care. Though he parted from the lawn care business, Bajema still helps McCarron with side jobs…

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Bethel’s first round of Act Six scholars prepare to graduate

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The scholarship that fuels the hopes and dreams of leaders. By Lindsey Micucci Act Six is a nationwide leadership scholarship program that seeks to affirm students who are seen as leaders within their communities, in hopes of encouraging those leadership skills to help make a difference in their communities and other communities in need. Based on the sixth chapter of Acts, Act Six looks to serve those who are in the margins. Or as Pang Moua, Diversity Inclusion Associate and Act Six Adviser, said, “Act Six looks to serve people or communities who are invisible or overseen.” This year, Bethel has now had 40 students and four cadres, or groups, through the Act Six program representing over 30 cities and 30 high schools. The first cadre of Act Six scholars will be graduating with a degree from Bethel University come spring. Ten scholars were welcomed in the fall of 2015.…

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Volleyball team recovers after head-on bus crash

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The Bethel University volleyball team won’t let adversity squelch its momentum. By Maddie DeBilzan After winning three of four matches in Naperville, Illinois and Whitewater, Wisconsin, the women’s volleyball team could finally sit back on the bus and rest for the long ride home. With a 21-5 record, the women had earned it. But shortly after they started their nearly-five-hour journey back to Bethel University, a pair of lights pierced through the wide Coach bus windows. The car was in their lane, headed directly towards the bus. According to the Rock County police department, the crash occurred at 8:12 p.m. when a Honda Civic passed the center line and hit the bus head-on. A 20-year-old woman from Waterford, Wisconsin was driving the car, with a 22-year-old man from Whitewater in the passenger seat. Both of them were pronounced dead at the scene. All 19 passengers and the bus driver —…

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