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Maddie DeBilzan

Maddie DeBilzan has 27 articles published.

2017-2018 sports editor of the Clarion.

The four of us

in Entertainment/Opinion by

Valentine’s Day doesn’t have to be a romantic holiday. By Maddie DeBilzan The four of us stride to the front of the line with our matching red White Bear Lake Recreation T-shirts and hand the beret-wearing Kodak photographer a couple of crumpled-up dollar bills. The eyelined girls who wore pink in line behind us giggle. “If you want a Valentine’s day photo with your friends,” the Central Middle School principal said the day before, “wear pink.” But we didn’t like pink. Pink was girly. Pink was for the sixth-grade girls who looked like miniature Bratz dolls, walking around with too much mascara snowballed on their eyelashes and over-straightened hair that looked like it was ready to fall off. When slept over in each other’s basements, we’d play Sardines and Wii Bowling and Truth or Dare. Then we’d make fun of girls who wore pink. “Mariah wears eyeliner, and mascara, and…

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Advice from the Maddies

in Opinion by

What should I do if Great Uncle Jim starts talking politics at the dinner table over the holidays? Do I engage with him, with my new sense of understanding and opinion? Or do I get up and start clearing plates as soon as possible? Maddie D.: I’m sure you have plenty of opinions about your great uncle’s political comments… but will voicing those thoughts really get anywhere? If Great Uncle Jim says something condescending — and doesn’t direct it towards you specifically — I’d probably just keep quiet and let Great Aunt Margie or Grandma Betty duke it out with him instead, if they so dare. Talking politics with a great uncle who probably has a lot to say sounds like a recipe for a bitter holiday dinner. I’d rather listen to the clanking of silverware as I’m clearing plates than my family coming at each other’s throats over foreign…

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Advice from the Maddies

in Opinion by

We asked Bethel students to submit questions this month about relationships. Maddie DeBilzan, our editor-in-chief, and Maddie Christy, our managing editor, have answered them with class, wisdom and a little bit of sass. Neither of them have degrees or experience in psychology, but they like to pretend. How many close friends is too many close friends? Maddie C: I have always heard you can only really have deep relationships with five to seven people. It’s not realistic to be deep friends with 25 people! But my friends and I often talk about how hard this is, especially in a community like Bethel. We all know so many people, and say “Hi” to 12 people when we walk down the hall. Is it possible to stop and ask all those people how they are really doing? No! We need to learn it’s OK to have concentric circles of friends. We can…

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Journalism in a Christian community

in Editorials/Letters from the editor/Opinion by

I’ve had many students confront me with views that seem to reflect a general misunderstanding of what The Clarion’s role is at Bethel University. Here’s a clarification. By Maddie DeBilzan I love Bethel University. I wear blue and gold to every Saturday afternoon football game. I love walking through the halls to see strangers holding doors for strangers. I love that I can leave my backpack outside of the Dining Center. I love saying “Hi” to people I barely know, and I love having roommates and classmates who push me to be better. I also love being a journalist. I love asking questions and having a professional reason to be curious. I love the adrenaline rush of having to submit a story six minutes after the football game ends. And I love piecing all my chicken-scratch notes together until a story is formed – one that’s honest, raw, and true.…

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Many community members upset, confused about program cuts

in News by

An email announced the majors and programs that will be discontinued, leaving many of the affected students, faculty and staff sad and confused. By Maddie DeBilzan and Jasmine Johnson Three days after a bleak Monday, when professors wore black and staff and faculty members were notified of cuts due to a budget shortfall, a 2:24 p.m. email from Bethel University President Jay Barnes popped up in every student’s inbox. It was stormy and thunder roared outside while students hunched over their laptops and read the news aloud to each other. Theatre, physical education, health education, media production, sociology and independent filmmaking majors will no longer be options for incoming students, the email said. The film studies minor will also be discontinued, and the reconciliation studies program will be moved to the Department of Social Work. Some majors that have been discontinued will still be offered as minors. “About 10 open…

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Here’s what’s going on at Bethel in the coming week

in News by

We get it. Sometimes the emails get jumbled, or you forget to check your inbox. So here’s a list of what’s going on at Bethel, according to Bethel Student Government and the Bethel E-Announcements. Student Activities is hosting the annual Kresge Kickoff from 8 to 11 p.m. Aug. 31 in Kresge Courtyard. According to the email, there will be “inflatables, caricaturists, lawn games, and great food.” The Wellness Center will host a kickoff celebration Sept. 4-7, where students can grab free snacks, enter to win prizes, and sign up for fitness classes. United Cultures of Bethel will celebrate its different subgroups in the BC from 6 to 7 p.m. between Aug. 29 and Sept. 6. Check your email for a more specific schedule. A student-led ministry called Without Ceasing will begin Sept. 11. According to the E-Announcements, the group is meant to “have faculty, staff and students from the Bethel…

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Letter from the editor

in Letters from the editor by

By Maddie DeBlizan On Jan. 5, I stepped off a New York City-bound plane and caught a turbulent taxi ride to 10 Hanover Square in lower Manhattan. I didn’t know a soul. I clutched my handheld alarm in my coat pocket the entire ride, just as my grandmother had instructed — just in case the taxi driver turned out to be a serial killer. The following four months, I waffled between sheer wonder and utter fear. But that’s how New York City works: one second you’re on top of the world, and the next second you’re clutching your personal alarm in your coat pocket, or stepping in dog poop with your brand new shoes, or running from a bearded man who is fast-approaching you with a sign that reads “free hugs”. One time, a woman next to me on the subway candidly reached into her bag and handed me a…

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