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#TFTB: What is your worst habit?

In the words of Trevor Limberg, “I always say I’m going to take some time to relax, but then I’m on my phone just mindlessly scrolling through Facebook everyday. That’s not very relaxing.” From swallowing too loud to not doing laundry, Bethel students share their worst habits on this installment of Thoughts from the Bubble. -Videographed by Maddie Christy, Josh Towner and Jake Van Loh. Produced by Josh Towner. Music is Back in Summer by Nicolai Heidlas. Keep Reading

Multimedia

#TFTB: What is the worst date you’ve ever had?

In the words of Mikayla Gratz: “We didn’t talk at all. It was very uncomfortable. At the end I gave him knucks.” From uncomfortable movies to spilled milkshakes, Bethel students talk about their worst dates in this installment of Thoughts from the Bubble. Keep Reading

Multimedia

A Whimsy lifestyle

Allie Lundeen and her sisters own a home decor shop called Whimsy Green at her home in Dassel, Minn. which brings together women from all over the United States. Keep Reading

Life after addiction

Ben Warnock sits cross-legged on his grey sheeted bed. Folding and unfolding his hands, breathing faster than normal, a half-mouthed smile disappears and reforms on his lips. Warnock is ready to share his story. He is ready to share his fight with alcoholism. Today Warnock is a recovery coach at Minnesota Adult and Teen Challenge, helping men with addictions like his own find and claim a future without alcohol. To reach this point was not easy. It took years of heartbreak, relapse and prayer for Warnock to fathom a life free from alcohol. Warnock first drank alcohol during his sophomore year at the University of Minnesota with his girlfriend at the time. It was not until the couple broke up that Warnock turned away from God and turned toward alcohol. Within a year, he was drinking a liter of vodka almost every day and beginning an eight-year-long journey of in-and-out… Keep Reading

24 hours at Bethel

The Clarion spread out across Bethel’s campus Monday, May 1 armed with cameras, notebooks and tripods. Here’s a multimedia peek of 24 hours at Bethel. By Clarion Staff 12:14 a.m. Selina Pineschi sits in the dining center kitchen waiting to clock out. She wears dark lipstick and her eyelids are covered in black eye shadow. Although she has worked five nights per week since she was a freshman, and she spends the majority of her day listening to the wailing of a coffee grinder, and she goes home each night to do homework until 4 a.m., her soft giggles in response to a co-worker’s joke don’t show it. While most college students are wrapping up their homework around midnight, Pineschi is just starting it. The junior graphic design major only averages about five hours of sleep a night. “And that’s on a good night,” says Pineschi. 1:02 a.m. Sam McKeown’s… Keep Reading

THE PULL: Author Jackie Lea Sommers

  By Arts & Culture Staff | Edited by Kellie Lawless | Photos by Carlo Holmberg Jackie Lea Sommers graduated from the University of Northwestern-St. Paul with a degree in creative writing. After working in the UNW Admissions office on the weekdays, she would spend her evenings and weekends writing what would become her debut novel, Truest. Her novel deals with issues of faith and mental illness, something that Sommers struggled with for over 20 years until she found treatment. Sommers lives in Minneapolis and is working on her second novel that is expected to be published in fall 2018. She visited Bethel University’s ENW360 Topics: Art and Culture Reporting class to tell stories about her struggle with OCD, her journey to publishing her first novel, and how they are closely intertwined. Look for more about Sommers on a future episode of Witty Ranter, The Clarion’s podcast. But for now, read and listen… Keep Reading

THE PULL: Washington Post reporter Faiz Siddiqui

By Arts & Culture Staff | Edited by Abby Petersen Faiz Siddiqui left the plains of Ohio and Nebraska to ride bikes, buses and Uber in Washington D.C. as a metro reporter for The Washington Post. Siddiqui has worked for NPR, The Boston Globe and the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. From pizzagate to scoliosis, Siddiqui can cover it all. I was a terrible student. I was a nerd, but not a book nerd. I threw myself into beat writing, which is how I approach things. I have a very obsessive personality. I covered a story of a headless, legless, armless body wearing a shirt that said “you got served.” That was my first real crime story at The Boston Globe when I was an intern there after my junior year. There is always someone with an axe to grind who wants to tell you something. You can find stories there. You call people up… Keep Reading

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