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BUILDing Relationships

By Carmen Syverson John Chouinard sat at Buffalo Wild Wings this fall semester with both first-year and second-year BUILD students. They all looked at him. Students he had just met. And students whom Chouinard reminded to do laundry every Monday night. Chouinard could see the growth in his second-year students and the potential of the first-year students all around one table on that fall evening. Chouinard, a junior at Bethel University, just filled out his application to be a BUILD housing mentor for the third year in a row. During Chouinard’s freshman year, he received an email from the BUILD program asking for applicants to be BUILD housing mentors. With no plans for roommates in place, Chouinard took the email as a sign to apply for a kind of housing situation that would look different from his classmates. Before coming to Bethel, Chouinard attended a small high school in Colorado… Keep Reading

FEATURED/Sports

The hometown hitter

A lifetime of playing baseball supplied Brian Raabe with the wisdom he needed to become a coach. By Jared Martinson Five-year-old Brian Raabe knew what his life was going to be. It was the same process as the rest of the kids in New Ulm, Minn., a small German town 98 miles southwest of the heart of the Twin Cities. When your hometown has as many professionally-kept baseball fields as city council members, you’re more likely to end up on a diamond than in an oval. And so Raabe dreamed a little more and worked a little more to find a way. Only the large metro-style cities of Minneapolis, St. Paul and St. Cloud can lay claim to owning as many big leaguers as New Ulm when it comes to Minnesota natives. Longtime catcher Terry Steinbach headlines the six ballplayers who have been recorded as major league participants. Brian Raabe… Keep Reading

News

Freshman mom

Brittanie Blume’s journey of being a full-time student and a full-time parent. By Sara Dvorak Brittanie Blume dropped two pregnancy tests and a Butterfinger peanut butter cup on the conveyor belt. She teetered in line at the new Dollar General in Grantsburg, WI. Since no one she knew worked there, no one would be in on the secret. She threw the Butterfinger on the conveyor belt as an afterthought. That way, if anyone asked, she could say she went to the store to get some chocolate. She got into her black 2007 Dodge Charger. Her hands shook as she drove exactly one mile to her house. Her sister was the only one home, and she was asleep on the charcoal couch. “Ok, I’m fine,” Blume thought. She set her timer for 10 minutes and perched on the edge of the folded-down toilet seat. Her mind was as empty as a… Keep Reading

Culture Arts & Lifestyle

A life without taste

Bethel University freshman uses a rare diagnosis as motivation to become a nurse. By Kate Holstein Anna Bruno managed to push off going to the doctor for one more day. She was busy. Tennis, soccer, track, violin and schoolwork all snuck up to the top of her priority list. What was one more day? A day off from school finally presented Bruno the opportunity to see a doctor. Her mom called to see if her daughter could get in for an appointment they thought would be routine. Sure she was thin, but nothing out of the ordinary. They knew her lack of appetite was concerning, but she had practice — she had school. That appointment would throw Bruno and her family into a frenzy of searching for answers. “After [the appointment] it was a night and day difference,” Bruno said. “All of a sudden I was in the hospital and… Keep Reading

Sports

Freshman works for the Wolves

Tyson Hohenecker gets a courtside view to NBA games as a team assistant for the Minnesota Timberwolves. By Judd Martinson Free shoes. Signed memorabilia. Courtside view. And all Bethel University freshman Tyson Hohenecker has to do is give star NBA players water in paper Gatorade cups. Hohenecker got a team assistant job for the Minnesota Timberwolves through his dad working for former Minnesota Timberwolves head coach Flip Saunders. “Flip said, ‘Hey, would Tyson want to come and be a ball kid,” Bill Hohenecker, Tyson’s dad said. Hohenecker’s dad worked first for the Timberwolves as a radio producer and then as a travel and facilities manager reporting to former Timberwolves coach Flip Saunders. “My dad was the glue that held a lot of the organization together because he knew how to coordinate with people,” Hohenecker said. Hohenecker’s dad currently works for Kevin Garnett. The two became friends while Garnett played for… Keep Reading

News

Next step forward

Bethel community members discuss the process of finding President Jay Barnes’ successor. By Sam Johnson Faculty and administration filed into the Underground Tuesday morning to get an update on the search process for President Jay Barnes’ successor. Barnes announced in a special chapel Feb. 28 his plans to retire in June 2020. At the gathering, President Barnes spoke about his level of trust in the upcoming search committee. “I have great confidence in our board of trustees in the way they will guide this search,” he said. Board of Trustees chair Julie White spoke about the responsibilities of the search committee. She acknowledged that this process of selecting the right candidate will take time. “We are starting work today, we are not finishing work today,” she said. White also mentioned that search committee chair Jim Green came to her like a gift from God. “Jim was my answer to prayer,”… Keep Reading

FEATURED/Sports

A smile that matters

Freshman Justin Evilsizer is not an average sports fan, rather he lives his life bringing joy and positivity to everyone he meets. By Sam Johnson Click. Click. Justin Evilsizer sits at a ticket table in front of the Robertson Center, using his blue stamper to send a smiley face onto fans’ wrists. Click. The Bethel’s men’s basketball team prepared to go against St. Thomas and Evilsizer greeted everyone, Royal or Tommie, with fist-bumps, high-fives, or a nod and a smile. Instead of spectators gazing at a Raisin’ Canes gift basket on top of the table as they entered the gym, filled with a baby blue t-shirt, a plush dog with a ‘Canes’ bandana, and layers of red confetti, they glanced first to someone else. His bright neon green shirt helped catch their attention. It might still be seen even if the building lost power. “Enjoy the game,” the decked-out Royals… Keep Reading

News

Sex-trafficking survivors tackle modern-day slavery

Speaker and founder of Rebecca Bender Initiative, Bender offers support to other survivors through recovery in her program. By Emma Harville Rebecca Bender woke up and rose out of bed as the sun slowly reached its way across the horizon. Her daughters slept peacefully in the other room as she sipped her coffee and began her daily devotions. An all too familiar vile feeling began to creep up inside of her as the sun’s rays washed over her. In another life, sunrise had signaled that it was time to go “home” to a master manipulator and controller after a long night of working. It was time to go home to her trafficker. “I felt like the Lord said, ‘How can you sit here in your warm house with your nice cup of coffee when you know what it’s like to be more afraid to go home than you are to… Keep Reading

News

A Rhoad(s) map

Music professor Mark Rhoads reflects on his time here at Bethel University as retirement nears. By Nick LaFrombois Mark Rhoads sat fence-side in his launch chair on a bright, sunny day as he waited for his daughter Allison to compete. The smell of horse sweat and manure fills the air. Dressed in boot-cut jeans, a white-frilled western shirt and an old beat-up cowboy hat, Allison sits on her chestnut colored horse, hooves stamping in place in anticipation. She takes off, and the race is over in five seconds. No matter how short the memory is, for music professor Dr. Mark Rhoads, the memory lasts a lifetime. These are some of Rhoads’ favorite memories with his daughter Allison. Hooking up the horse trailer to his 81’, ¾ ton, forestry green Dodge pickup, driving Allison and her horse, Rags, to various horse tracks around the Twin Cities to compete, and eating at… Keep Reading

FEATURED/Sports

On my own two feet

A double amputee, Elena Evans made strides longer than she ever imagined possible. By Zach Walker Elena Evans loved summer camp. Suspended by paracord at the top of a rock wall, she surveyed Trout Lake. The water and the trees and the toddlers stared up at her like she was royalty. Releasing her grip, she descended through woodland air, the smell of pine and campfire smoke welcoming her back. The rope went slack as she landed on feet that weren’t hers. Novocherkassk, Russia — In 1996, there was no cure for physical deformation. No medicine, no therapy, no special care. Most kids learned how to walk. Evans did too, just on her knees. Evans was born with feet that curved in. Not the standard angle, but a sharp diversion toward the opposite calf. She did a sort of shuffle across the orphanage floor, her feet lagging behind. It was there… Keep Reading

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